Moving Past Sexual Abuse Group Starting Soon

Raeburn House, Auckland, New Zealand, is running another Moving Past Sexual Abuse group. In the past the group was organised as a support group in which participants would be surrounded by survivors who understood their experiences and sharing one’s stories and supporting each other was the strongest emphasis.

This new Moving Past Sexual Abuse group is about discovering ways of how to leave the abuse and the legacies of the abuse behind oneself. Rather than concentrating on what happened in the past the emphasis is on having a life worth living NOW, today, and the days to come.

You will be shown how it is possible to regain control and reconnect with joy, wisdom, and peace of mind. You will find that the capacity to live in wellness has always been dormant within you waiting for you to connect with it. The Moving Past Abuse group is geared to help you realise that potential!

You can expect that we will address how to deal with anger, difficult emotions, social connections, relationships with self and others, depression, perceptions, thought, and in general how not to be ruled by the past.

Here are the starting dates and details:

When: Mondays, 8 weeks, Starts 30 July
Time:·7:00pm – 9:00pm
Total Cost: $80
Facilitator: Gudrun Frerichs
Venue: Raeburn House, 138 Shakespeare Road, Milford

For more information contact Raeburn House, phone: (09) 441 8989 or emaillearning@raeburnhouse.org.nz.

Find more interesting groups run by Raeburn House by going to their website.

Moving Past Sexual Abuse Support Group

The next sexual abuse survivor support group with the focus on moving past sexual abuse and creating a life worth living will start on:

Thursday, 28th of July 2011, 7PM – 9 PM
Raeburn House, Takapuna

The group runs for 8 weeks – there is space for 2 more people to join. In the past the cost has been $45 for the 8 weeks. For more information and/or enrolment contact Raeburn House, phone: (09) 441 8989 or email learning@raeburnhouse.org.nz.

 

Survivor Support Groups Term II/2011

The new dates for the Sexual Abuse Survivor Support Groups at Raeburn House are finalised. There are still a few spaces left for both groups. It is advisable that participants are in some form of counselling so that any critical issues that might be triggered by group conversations can be worked through appropriately. People should discuss with their counsellor their wish to attend our support groups.

Moving Past Sexual Abuse
This group looks at the long term effects of abuse and explores how to move past them. Besides attending to difficulties participants encounter in the present, we will spend time each session exploring: disclosure, safety, self-awareness, coping strategies, boundaries, stress, and trust.

Thursdays, 10 weeks, starts 5 May 7:00pm – 9:00pm
Facilitator: Dr. Gudrun Frerichs
Total Cost: $60
Surviving Sexual Abuse
This group aims to aid recovery and strength for women in a safe environment. Besides attending to difficulties participants encounter in the present, we will spend time each session exploring: group members’ relationship styles, family dynamics, understanding and embracing sexuality, feelings, shame, assertiveness, support systems, and self-esteem.

Wednesdays, 10 weeks, starts 11 May 7:00pm – 9:00pm
Facilitator: Dr. Gudrun Frerichs
Total Cost: $60

Course bookings and payments can now be made online
at www.raeburnhouse.org.nz

138 Shakespeare Road
Milford, North Shore 0622
PO Box 36 336
Northcote, North Shore 0748
Raeburn House
Phone: (09) 441 8989
Facsimile: (09) 441 8988
Email: info@raeburnhouse.org.nz

Coping When Disaster Strikes

A terrifying disaster like the Christchurch Earthquake has a huge impact on people. We are confronted with the fragility of life, with the unpredictability of our physical safety on this planet, and with our inability to protect ourselves and loved ones from such tragedies. Trauma people may have experienced earlier in their lives often gets triggered and they find themselves thrown back again into the depth of traumatisation.

When you have been touched by a traumatic event and you feel emotionally numb, irritable, angry, or tearful, don’t be self-critical because these feelings are some of the normal feelings people have as a response to an un-normal event. You might experience sleeplessness, hypervigilance, nightmares, or avoid thinking about what happend: all these reactions are normal. These symptoms may go on for several months and in some cases they could turn into a Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

Whilst we cannot ‘not’ be affected by trauma one way or the other, most people are free of any symptoms after a few months. However, there are a few things people can do to help coping whilst they experience trauma symptoms and to avoid longlasting problems.

The world has seen devastating catastrophic events such as natural disasters, extreme poverty and famine, wars, political terror, slavery, and the abuse of individuals on a grand scale. Yet, in the aftermath of devastation, traumatized individuals have usually been able to recover and rebuild their lives and their countries. One characteristic of human societies is that people come together and seek closeness with others to help with the integration of traumatic experiences. “Emotional attachment is probably the primary protection against feelings of helplessness and meaninglessness; it is essential for biological survival in children, and without it, existential meaning is unthinkable in adults” (Kolk & McFarlane, Traumatic Stress, 1996, p. 24).  Seeking and giving support when traumatic events strike is one of the most effective ways to help people cope.

In times of crisis and heightened stress the first rule of conduct is: BACK TO BASICS. In order to be able to keep up with the extra pressure on your emotional and physical functioning, its vital that you look after your basic needs first. You can only be of help to others when you are taken care of. A car without petrol is no use to anybody … it won’t run.

Make sure you get some decent amount of food – actually, foods high on carbohydrates (sugars) have a stress reducing effect – and don’t forget to stay hydrated. Without enough fluids we humans tend to not function that well. It is also important to get enough sleep, and if you can’t sleep, get some rest somehow. Stay active by either helping with the clean-up, running, cleaning up your yard or house, giving a hand to people in need.

It helps to stay away from alcohol, recreational drugs, and cigarettes. These substances compromise your thinking speed and quality, and they are an extra stress on your body.

Goodbye Dear Jacqui

 

Christian_lb0007 The unthinkable has happened! A very much loved and admired member of our support group has cruelly been robbed of a promising future, has been torn away from her family and her friends. Has been torn away from us.

Her commitment to healing the past and embracing all the different parts of herself was a glowing example to all of us. Her love and support for others seemed to flow from an inexhaustible well deep inside her. Words can not express how much she will be missed. Jacqui loved angels – she sure will be one of them now!

What happened to Jacqui affirms what this site is all about: We have to stop the violence against women, men, and children. We have to – the cost is too high!

 

ACC: The Modern Brothers Grimm

Dali butterfly  Has anyone seen today's article in the New Zealand Herald about ACC failing to help most sexual abuse survivors? Follow the link to read the whole thing – or get the paper out, it's on page 4. It mentions that we are having the survivor summit this coming Sunday, which is a good thing! It's hard enough to get supportive media coverage for the plight of survivors. What did irk me off was Denise Cosgrosve's (ACC General Manager of Claims Management) comment: 

Continue reading

ACC: The Modern Brothers Grimm

Dali butterfly  Has anyone seen today's article in the New Zealand Herald about ACC failing to help most sexual abuse survivors? Follow the link to read the whole thing – or get the paper out, it's on page 4. It mentions that we are having the survivor summit this coming Sunday, which is a good thing! It's hard enough to get supportive media coverage for the plight of survivors. What did irk me off was Denise Cosgrosve's (ACC General Manager of Claims Management) comment: 

Continue reading

Survivors Experience with the new ACC Pathway

 

Kid boy Survivors have spoken out about their experiences with the new clinical pathway introduced by ACC in October 2009. We are still collecting responses, so if you haven't taken the survey yet, go to the survey page and fill it out. The results from this survey will be presented to the Review Panel appointed by the Minister for ACC, Nick Smith. In total 103 survivors have filled out the survey. In the following you can read their answers to the question "Comment on your overall experience with the New ACC pathway": 

Read more here

 

Do you have to hurt to heal?

Wild flowers  Someone has told me yesterday how hard it is to see other people hurt. That on top of your own struggle with hurting, hoping and intermittently wanting to give up, is a roller coaster that has many survivors walking along a thin line between surviving and not surviving.

Everyone has heard the proverb "It has to get worse before it gets better". That's of course not always the case, but, in general, that's the way it works. I believe, that's the way it has to work. It's part of the healing process. Let me explain:

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Sexual Abuse Survivor’s Support Group

Happy sign It's a new year and for those who live in the Auckland/North Shore region, Raeburn House is running the support group 'Moving Past Sexual Abuse" again for this year. Here are the details:

When: Thursdays, 8 weeks, starts 11 February
Time:
7:00pm – 9:00pm
Total Cost:
$45
Facilitator:
Gudrun Frerichs

This group creates a safe community of women who share their experiences to recover from the affects of abuse and transform them into strengths. Covers issues of safety, trust, boundaries, assertiveness, self-esteem, relationships, sexuality, and intimacy.

For more information contact Raeburn House, phone: (09) 441 8989 or email luciana@raeburnhouse.org.nz.

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